“Make It Rain” by Chris Spisak

Hello folks! I wanted to take just a few moments of your time to pitch an Indiegogo project that is trying to raise money right now. It’s for a short film called “Make It Rain” by Chris Spisak, a local Houston filmmaker. I’m a big fan of supporting local artists and indie filmmakers. Also, my brother knows the filmmaker, which is a good enough reason for me.

Here’s the pitch for the film:

MAKE IT RAIN (2013)

Written and Directed by Chris Spisak
Starring Dave MaldonadoCandice BarleyJohn McClainJohn LopezA story about basketball, youthful innocence, and the power of hope, Make It Rain tells the story of a young boy’s efforts to help his family overcome the effects of a devastating drought which result in a magical night he won’t soon forget.The film is currently raising funds for a summer 2013 shoot.  To learn more about how you can be a part of the Make It Rain team and gain exclusive access to the making of the film and receive other fantastic perks, visit our fundraising page here!

Once more, here is the link to the Indiegogo page, including their salespitch video: “Make It Rain” 

If that doesn’t give you enough to go off of, and you’d like to know a bit more about Chris Spisak before you decide if you’re going to back him or not, you can check out his previous short films (which have been presented at several film festivals in Texas) on his website here: Two 21 Entertainment.I’d appreciate it if you could take a look. And even if you can’t afford to donate right now (though even a few dollars helps), please consider spreading the word.

Thanks!

And the Dark Knight Rises Again

I would like to begin by saying that the violence in Aurora, Colorado is a horrible shock and tragedy, and my thoughts are with all the victims and their families.  I saw the news this morning, and I have trouble comprehending how such a thing can happen.  I just don’t understand how a person can do such a thing.  I understand that some people are nervous about the possibilities of a copy-cat, but some of the comments from people who think that Warner Bros. should pull Dark Knight Rises from theatres just do not make sense to me.  You can blame the movie or the movie industry for the actions of a madman (and this man clearly has mental issues), and it would be unreasonable to penalize the movie or the industry because of this.

My brother and I had made plans to go see Dark Knight Rises today, and even after we heard the news about the shooting, we decided to go anyway.  We went to an early afternoon IMAX showing, and it was still a sold-out show.

I’m afraid I won’t actually be able to say much, because I’m TERRIFIED of accidentally revealing too much — and this is NOT a movie that should be ruined for anyone.  So I’m just going to say a few vague words and assure you all that it is DEFINITELY DEFINITELY worth seeing.

Let me start with the obvious: I love Batman, I love Christian Bale, and I love Christopher Nolan movies.  I was BLOWN AWAY by both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.  And while I had been watching the casting for this third movie with some trepidation (it seemed like Nolan was casting too many big names, which hinted to me that he might have bitten off more than he could chew), I was still extremely excited to see this movie.  I had some pretty high expectations.  This movie met (and in some cases exceeded) all of them.

As always, Christian Bale was brilliant.  I was also seriously impressed by Anne Hathaway as Catwoman/Selena Kyle.  Of course, Tom Hardy is also amazing, and he was fantastically threatening as Bane.  And Joseph Gordon-Levitt was wonderful as Blake as well.  I especially really liked Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s character, in fact.  He’s a younger cop, working with Gordon, and he’s just really REALLY likable.

Visually, this movie was STUNNING.  I saw it in IMAX, and the cityscapes: OMG! Seriously. AMAZING.  Also, one of the complaints I’ve had about Nolan in the past is that his fight scenes are often extremely difficult to follow.  He uses ultra-close close-ups so that everything is blurry and you’re too close to the body to see who’s hitting who, etc.  He seems to have learned his lesson in this movie, and the fight scenes were MUCH more clear and easy to follow.  They were also BRUTAL.  The fight scenes between Batman and Bane: oh WOW.  INTENSE.

And, of course, the writing was fantastic.  I have a few small complaints, but I don’t want to get into them because they would all reveal too much, and they were small enough not to injure the movie much.

A couple other complaints I have: another problem that seems to be common with Nolan is some imbalances with the sound.  There are a number of places in the movie were the score drowns out the dialogue so you really cannot tell what the people are saying.  Also, despite Nolan having gone back in to fix things after initial complaints, there are a few points where it is difficult to understand what Bane is saying through the mask.

Also, there was not NEARLY enough Michael Caine as Alfred.  I won’t get into why, but he just didn’t get as much screen time as he deserved.  I also have some detail-oriented issues with a few plot devices, especially at the end.  One thing about Nolan: he is a fantastic, brilliant “BIG ideas” man, but he sometimes trips up on the details.  That is obvious in a few places in this movie.

And I haven’t quite decided how I feel about the ending.

Despite these small complaints (and they really are only small complaints) this was an absolutely brilliant movie.  Intelligent, intense, visually gorgeous, with some great writing, and just about perfect casting/acting.  It is a fitting end to this particular Batman era, and definitely does justice to the hopes and expectations raised by The Dark Knight, and you should all go see it as soon as possible.

As for me: I’ll probably be seeing again soon.  It’s definitely a more-than-once kind of movie.  That’s for damn sure.

Side note: I had a pretty cool experience on Thursday night (which is why I didn’t go to a midnight release showing of Dark Knight Rises in the first place), and hopefully I’ll be able to write it all down on sunday.  ‘Cause it was pretty damn cool.

They Finally Got It Right: A Review of The Amazing Spider Man

On Sunday I went to see The Amazing Spider Man, the newest reboot of the Spider Man franchise.  When I first heard that Marvel was once again trying to make a Spider Man movie I was pretty skeptical about it.  But when I saw the first full trailer I got pretty excited, and I had pretty high hopes going into it. And, for the most part, I’d say this movie met them.  They’ve finally done Spider Man RIGHT.

The Amazing Spider Man (directed by Marc Web) once again revisits Spider Man’s origin story, this time paying a bit more attention to the original comics than the Tobey Maguire movies did.  I assume by now that most people (if not everyone) knows what the basic origin story is, right?  I don’t want to give too much away, but I think it’s safe to talk about the basics: Peter Parker’s parents disappear one night when he’s young, leaving him in the care of his Uncle Ben and Aunt May, and never returning.  It’s presumed they are dead, though it is never confirmed.  Peter Parker, now a teenager in high school, is a bit of a geek/outcast, with more smarts than he really knows what to do with, and who has a crush on beautiful, popular Gwen Stacey.  Then, in a series of events that I’ll let you watch (the way they did in this movie was actually pretty funny), Peter is bitten by a genetically-altered spider, and everything gets crazy for him from there.

One of the main things this version did right was the simple fact of Gwen Stacey’s presence in the movie.  Most non-comics fans are only really familiar with Mary-Jane as Peter’s love interest, but in the comics Gwen Stacey is around first and for a long time before Mary-Jane shows up.  Mary-Jane only because the love interest as Gwen has died – no, I’m not giving away anything, I swear: Gwen does not die in the movie, and I have NO IDEA how or even IF the movies will deal with that plot line from the comics.  In any case, I was so happy Gwen was in this movie.  I’ve always found Mary-Jane to be a fairly annoying character, actually, and I’ve always liked Gwen much MUCH more.  And, of course, Emma Stone did a superb job portraying her: she’s whip-smart, spunky, and compassionate.

Then, of course, there is the casting choice for Peter/Spider Man.  Andrew Garfield was the PERFECT choice.  He looks right – he’s got the long, thin, wiry look to him that just works for Spider Man.  He gave the character so much of the sarcasm and feistiness that was missing in the Tobey Maguire versions, and while he has a few moments of angst, he’s not whiny like Tobey Maguire’s version was.  He really just did a fantastic job with the character. Also, the suit looks AWESOME.

And the chemistry between Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone! I’ve been reading comments about it on various pre-release comments and reviews for a while, and they are not exaggerated.  The chemistry was wonderfully palpable.  It’s easy to believe that these two actors ended up dating in real life.  They just look RIGHT together.

The one complaint I’ve heard is that while the scenes between Peter and Gwen are well done: well-written, well-acted, etc, the constant back and forth between the slower relationship scenes and the more action-y plot-important scenes slows the pace down too much in the movie.  I haven’t decided yet exactly how I feel about it.  For the most part I disagree.  As I was watching it, I didn’t feel that the pace suffered much, if at all.  However, when I think about it, I can still see how someone might make that argument.  I myself was fine with the way they did it: the movie is, to me at least, more about the relationships, and about Peter’s personal growth, and the focus doesn’t necessary NEED to stay exclusively on the action/adventure stuff.  But if you go into really wanting it to be a high-energy action film (like Avengers, perhaps) you will be just a touch disappointed by the slower pace.

That is, however, the ONLY criticism I think anyone can really make about the movie.

The plot, despite the relationship stuff, is still important and tense.  And I really like the villain, Curt Connors (aka, Lizard).  What I liked is that he’s not REALLY a villain.  I mean, he’s not evil.  He’s sympathetic, and we as an audience get to watch his slow slide into bad decisions and madness.  He feels very human and flawed and desperate, rather than some kind of cliché, over-the-top, one-dimensional comic book villain.  And I really appreciated that.

And then, of course, the cinematography (by John Schwartzmann) was wonderful.  Absolutely GORGEOUS to watch.  Rich color, detailed settings – with some really great shots of New York City, and some great angles and panning shots too.  I’ve read a criticism about the musical score (by James Horner, of course) somewhere (I can’t remember where now) but I don’t really agree.  I thought the score had great power and emotion, some dark lows and some bright highs, and a big epic feeling.

All in all, The Amazing Spider Man was a fantastic, wonderfully enjoyable movie, and I highly recommend it to anyone who looks comic book movies, or just a good adventure film.

Now, for a look at some of the science behind the movie, please check out my friend Andrew Kincaid’s discussion: “Comic Book Science Is Right For Once (Sort Of) – A Qausi-Review of The Amazing Spider Man.”

Family Troubles in Disney/Pixar’s Brave

So, I saw Disney/Pixar’s Brave on Sunday.  And let me just say: it was gorgeous!  Visually it was absolutely stunning, and every other review I’ve read so far agrees on that point at the very least.  The scene design, the colors, the lighting, the character design – all rich and detailed and full of depth and emotion.  A feast for the eyes.  Art in motion.  Seriously.  It’s obvious that the animators took a lot of time to study Scotland’s landscapes, fell in love with it, and decided to share that love with the world (of course, who doesn’t fall in love with Scotland’s landscapes?)

Now, as for the rest of it.  I’ve read a few reviews that have been absolutely and completely glowing, but I think most people seem to agree with my general impression: while Brave was definitely enjoyable, and I liked it, the storytelling was simply not up to par with Pixar’s usual work.

The previews give you the basic premise: Princess Merida, with her boisterous, somewhat goofy father, the king, and her strict, prim and proper mother, the queen, is supposed to choose a first-born son from one of the other clans to marry.  But Merida is head-strong and boisterous like her father, enjoys the unladylike pursuits of horseback riding and archery, and has no intention of getting married any time soon.  So she goes to a witch (always a bad idea) to get a spell that will “change her fate.”  As always in these things, she doesn’t quite get what she’d intended and things go downhill from there.

What I liked about this movie was that it was family-centered.  The drama and conflict is between a headstrong daughter and her strict mother; it is about a family that is tearing itself apart because the mother believes in upholding tradition and the daughter wants to break away and “make her own fate.”  There is no prince in this story, there is no romance sub-plot and there isn’t even really a “real villain.”  It’s all about the family.  And I liked that.

I also really liked Merida.  She’s feisty and strong and stubborn and smart.  And, of course, she’s flawed and makes some less-than-stellar choices.  However, I don’t think the writers give her enough to do, quite frankly.  While I liked the idea of a conflict centered on the family, there just wasn’t enough going on in this movie.  And I think the mother, Queen Elinor, kind of steals the show.  In a lot of ways she’s as much the main character as Merida is.

Some people have complained about the way the father, King Fergus, is portrayed.  He is a bit goofy, a bit hapless, and it is clear very quickly that Queen Elinor is the one in charge of that particular household.  And some people have not been happy about that, complaining that this portrayal makes the father an idiot, which is an insult to fathers (I would imagine that complaint mainly comes from men).  But here’s the thing: I don’t think they make King Fergus an idiot.  He’s big and loud and friendly.  He’s a warrior who’s more comfortable on the battlefield or hunting, rather than playing diplomat or administrator.  Queen Elinor just happens to be the one who’s better at the social niceties, the administrative duties and the public speaking.  That doesn’t make Fergus an idiot.  And, let’s be frank, it is very common for the father to be the fun-loving, I-don’t-want-to-discipline-the-children type, and for the mother to be the one in charge of keeping the family under control.

All that being said, the plot was a bit formulaic.  A princess that refuses to choose a husband, making a wish that backfires, etc… it’s all be done before.  Of course, everything’s been done before, and there’s nothing wrong with taking an old premise and building something new on top of it, but I don’t think Pixar did a particularly good job of building something new on top of it this time around.

While I enjoyed the movie, and it was certainly a pleasure to look at, it was not particularly riveting, or emotionally impactful, or even particularly new.  And it certainly won’t be replacing any of my current favorites.  In terms of family-centered drama, it comes nowhere close to either Finding Nemo or The Incredibles (my two favorite Pixar movies).  And in terms of feisty female leads, or humor, it can’t even touch Mulan or Tangled.

So, in recap: Brave was fun, it was beautiful to look at, I enjoyed it, and I definitely recommend it if you like Disney/Pixar movies, but don’t expect it to blast any earlier Disney/Pixar movies out of the water.

Gorgeous, Intense, and Creepy: A Review of Prometheus

So, let’s talk about Prometheus (and then I’ll get back to my insane fan-girl raving about Sherlock, I promise).

For those who are unfamiliar with the background of Prometheus, it is a science fiction film produced and directed by Ridley Scott (director of Alien, Blade Runner, and Gladiator, to name just a few) and is considered a prequel of sorts to the original Alien movie.  Prometheus (which is also the name of the spaceship the cast lives on) takes place in the year 2093 (Alien takes place in the year 2122), and follows a group of scientists who believe that aliens called Engineers seeded life on Earth, and who are in search of those aliens in deep space, on a moon called LV-223.  Of course, as anyone familiar with the Alien movies would expect, things do not go according to plan, as the scientists find nothing but death on the moon (and boy, it’s going to be hard to talk about this movie without giving too much away…).

Okay, so let’s start by talking about the direction and cinematography in this movie, because it was BRILLIANT.  The opening sequence is one of the most beautiful I’ve seen in ages and ages.  The camera pans through images of wild, almost-but-not-quite barren landscape: rocks, mountains, snow, waterfalls, etc.  It’s like something out of the Planet Earth nature documentaries, in astounding high definition, with a powerful score building up around you.  And then it focuses in on what is clearly an alien – mostly human in shape but with musculature that no human could possibly have, and a slightly different shape in the nose and forehead.  The alien drinks something, and then starts to dissolve, his DNA literally breaking apart – one would assume, to seed the earth.  The image of the alien dissolving is pretty cringe-worthy, but so well-shot and so fascinating and creepy.  It was the perfect way to open the movie, that’s for sure.

Throughout the rest of the film, the cinematography is equally wonderful.  Ridley Scott, the screen-writers, the set designer, and the cinematographer all took tremendous care with the visuals of the story.  The visuals are highly important in this movie.  The attention to detail, the atmospheric nature, the grand scale and immensity of everything, not to mention how CREEPY a lot of it is.  And the camera captures all of it so beautifully.  Seriously, if nothing else, go see it for the visual interest – it’s like a moving piece of art.

Then there are the actors.  The casting for this movie was so well done.  Swedish actress, Noomi Rapace plays Dr. Elizabeth Shaw, an archeologist, who along with her partner/boyfriend Charlie Holloway (played by Logan Marshall-Green), are the scientists pretty much in charge of the mission on the Prometheus. Noomi Rapace is really making a name for herself.  She played Lisbeth Salander in the original film version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and she was in the second Sherlock Holmes movie (and she only learned to speak English in time to film Sherlock Holmes!), and she is a very very good actress.  She does such an amazing job in this movie, with a character who is incredibly smart, more than a little naïve, sympathetic, and tough.

Then there’s Charlize Theron.  My GOD, she looks GOOD in this movie.  It’s just not fair.  And, as usual, she is phenomenal as the cold, calculating, self-serving corporate leader of the Prometheus mission, Meredith Vickers. This character walks that fine line between being emotionless and self-serving to the point of being almost-but-not-quite evil.  She’s CREEPY, and she’s not even really a bad guy.  Just kind of a bitch.  And Charlize Theron plays it so well.

Last, but certainly not least among the main characters, there is Michael Fassbender as David, the android (like Ash, from the original Alien movie, though in Prometheus, everyone already knows he’s an android).  This character was absolutely fascinating, a total enigma.  And Michael Fassbender was EXCELLENT.  Seriously excellent.  David is an odd character – childlike in ways, sometimes sympathetic, but also with this weird underlying… I don’t know, jealousy? bitterness? arrogance?, because of the way the humans treat him.

No one pays much attention to him or is even mildly polite to him except for Shaw – and, of course, we should all know by now that is a BAD idea to mistreat a robot who is WAY stronger and smarter than any human.  You get this weird sense that David wants people to acknowledge how smart he is, and feels superior to humans because of his strength and intelligence, but also wants to be human at the same time.  He does some pretty despicable things in this movie (I’m trying very hard not to give away too much!), but you can’t quite hate him and you can’t really blame him, because the humans do NOT treat him well.  And Michael Fassbender plays him with this kind of blankness, this vacancy in his face and movements, and yet with very subtle touches of expression, of tone, or movement, that hint at something lying just beneath the surface, as if David can feel more than he or anyone else imagines – despite the fact that androids purportedly have no emotions.  Michael Fassbender’s light touch is just so well done, so balanced and subtle.  It’s definitely impressive.

All of the other actors, including Idris Elba as the captain of the ship, do not get nearly as much screen time and are not nearly as important to the plot, but they still do a good job.  They give the whole film a sense of realism and immediacy, a sense of real people in real crisis situations, that would not be believable with a less talented cast.  All without overtaking the film, being too melodramatic, or stealing the scenes from the important characters (and Idris Elba’s interactions with Charlize Theron are pretty fun too).

As for the plot itself…  It’s complex and it keeps you guessing, keeps you on your toes, without every getting so convoluted that it risks bogging itself down – at least not to me, others might disagree (after all, where I found Inception totally lucid, though complex, some people complained that it made no sense whatsoever – of course, I worry about people like that, but that’s beside the point).  There is a LOT going on in this film.  The first half-hour or so is a little slow-moving.  It’s not a BAD thing to me, it’s not slow as in boring, more as in atmospheric. It’s like a slow crescendo at the beginning of symphony.  Just because the music isn’t fast or frenetic doesn’t mean it’s not full of power and interest.  And you know your patience will be well worth it anyway.  So, yes, the opening is slow in pace, but it WORKS, at least for me.  And then, once it picks up, OH BOY does it pick up.  The last forty minutes or so?  CRAZY INTENSE.

All of this is helped along quite liberally by a very well-written, beautiful, and intense score by Marc Streitenfeld.  The music fits the movie so well: atmospheric, creepy, with slow build-ups and intense explosions of power and sound.  I already mentioned how the score bolsters the opening sequence.  The whole movie is like that.  I’m definitely going to have buy the soundtrack later.  There are few things I love more than a really good movie score.

Last, but certainly not least, is the long list of connections to the original Alien movie.  Now, there is not a 1 for 1 correlation between things in this movie and things in Alien.  It doesn’t quite work like that.  But if you’re a fan of Alien and pay attention, it is a TON of fun to catch all the little references.  I had to have my brother’s help with that.  I love the first and second Alien movies, but I have trouble remembering as many of the little details as my brother does.  Still, here are justa couple things to keep in mind.

First, Prometheus takes place on the moon LV-223, whereas Alien takes place on the moon LV-426 – so the ships the Prometheus finds and all the details in this movie do NOT correlate with actual scenes from Alien.  The alien ship that the Nostromo finds in Alien is a DIFFERENT SHIP than the one that the crew of the Prometheus find.  However, it is the same KIND of ship.  And the Space Jockey from Alien?  Yeah, some kind of alien as the main aliens in Prometheus.

Second, because Prometheus focuses on the Engineers, the humanoid-looking aliens who seeded the Earth (and who are the same kind of alien as the Space Jockey) you are NOT going to see the traditional black-skinned long-faced alien or the face-huggers and chest-bursters from Alien.  However, because it is a prequel, it is easy to guess that the plot of Prometheus leads INTO the aliens from the Alien movies (and oh my god, I’m getting sick of typing the word “alien”).

For a more in-depth look into the connections between the movies, check out this explanation Screenrant: “Prometheus – Alien Connection Explained.”

I could probably go on and on if I really wanted to, but I think this covers all the big stuff, except for the ending.  Without giving too much away, I will say that the ending is a bit cliff-hangery and you are left with WAY more questions than you had the beginning of the film, but I think this is intentional.  My brother and I have been debating how many of the holes and questions are intentional for the purposes of leading into a sequel and how many are accidental due to holes in the writing itself.  The only way to find out, of course, is to wait for a sequel, which we’re both PRETTY sure is in the offing.

The main thing you should get out of all of this is: if you haven’t seen Prometheus yet, YOU NEED TO.  GO NOW.  It is absolutely phenomenal.  The intensity, the attention to detail, the beautiful cinematography, the excellent cast, the fun references to Alien… it all equals a movie that is WELL worth the money and the time.  In fact, I recommend seeing it more than once.  I’m hoping to go again soon and see how many small details I may have missed the first time.

Seriously, just go see it.  You can thank me later.

Also, you should check out Andrew Kincaid’s rundown of the biology behind the film over on his blog.

AND, here’s the trailer again, too, just to cover all my bases:

Arrietty’s Secret is She’s Boring

So, I finally got around to seeing The Secret World of Arrietty, and as you may be able to guess from the title of this post, I was not less than impressed.

For those who aren’t in the know, The Secret World of Arrietty is a Japanese animated film, produced by Studio Ghibli, based on the novel The Borrowers by Mary Norton, with a screenplay by Hayao Miyazaki (of Spirited Away and Howl’s Moving Castle fame), directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi, and distributed in the U.S. by Disney (as most of the Studio Ghibli films have been).

Now, I’ve never read the original book, which may or may not be a good thing in trying to evaluate this movie, so everything I say is based purely on the movie and Miyazaki’s adaptation, rather than the novel itself.  I’m going to skip an involved summary because I think most people know the basic story, but generally: it’s about Arrietty and her family, the tiny Borrowers who live in the floorboards of a house and “borrow” things they need to survive.

As always with Miyazaki, the animation was gorgeous.  Simply GORGEOUS.  He and his production crew have an amazing eye for color and detail and depth – every scene is lush and vivid and inviting, full of life and color and a strong feeling of nostalgia.  That has not changed with this movie.  I think I will always be impressed and awed by the art direction in all of Studio Ghibli’s movies, and nothing can change that.  For example, check these out:

The problem starts, for me, with the voice acting.  I have grown quite sick of Disney’s management of the Studio Ghibli films they bring to the U.S.  Their casting choices are often horrendous.  I hated most of the voice-acting in Ponyo, and I hated ALL of the voice-acting in Arrietty.  It was astoundingly bad.  Not only did they cast a couple annoying, talentless, Disney Channel “actors” (Bridgit Mendler and David Henrie) but even Carol Burnett (whom I usually adore) did an atrocious job.  And Will Arnett, who played Arrietty’s father, was so flat and lifeless I thought for sure they had actually hired a zombie version of him.

To make matters worse: the SINGING!  Normally, Joe Hisaishi composes the scores for Miyazaki’s films, but this time they hired a French songwriter/singer named Cecile Corbel.  I’ll say this, she is a good composer.  I liked the score, and the songs with lyrics had nice melodies.  Sadly, I don’t understand WHY she’s a popular singer, because her voice was so tinny, infantile, and cloying I wanted to throw up every time she started singing.  And she did at least three times through the course of the movie.  In comparison, Bridgit Mendler’s song during the credits was almost bearable.  ALMOST.

What’s really sad though, is that even if Disney had cast better voice-actors, and even if Cecile Corbel had found someone else to do the singing for her, it would not have been enough to save this movie.  The plot was, sadly, really REALLY BORING.  It was slow and dragging.  By the end of the first half-hour I was tempted to turn it off.  It lacked all the depth, liveliness, and touches of humor that Miyazaki’s films normally have.  And after  Ponyo (which was cute, but fairly forgettable) and THIS, I’m really beginning to worry that Miyazaki has lost his touch completely.

And if that’s true, it’s a sad sad day in cinema.

The Avengers KICKED ASS, and other films worth considering

Hi folks! I’m being a bad bad student… I should be working on a paper that’s due next monday, but instead I’m here.  But I just had to share a few things.  So give me a few minutes and then I’ll be out of your hair and back to work.

Thanks to my brother, who is a film production student and can get a hold of these things, I was able to go to an advanced screening of The Avengers last night.  The advanced ticket passes did not guarantee entrance, so we had to stand in line for 2 1/2 hrs, and the event was BADLY organized by the AMC people and the Disney reps.  So much so, that I was really REALLY beginning to regret going to thing as I finally sat down in the 2nd row of the theatre.  Half-way through the movie: I wasn’t regretting it anymore.

I don’t want to give away too much, but I want to take a few minutes to sing this movie’s praises.

First of all, The Avengers was visually STUNNING.  I saw it in 3D, which I’m not usually a big fan of, but this 3D was done very well.  They didn’t overdo it, and a few times I was actually impressed by the depth it added to the image.  The special effects were AMAZING.  And the fight scenes were AWESOME.  So well choreographed, so well done by the actors, stunt-men, and FX people, and for the most part very cleanly filmed.  You know how sometimes in movies the fight scenes get very blurry so you can’t quite tell what’s going on?  This is a problem in a lot of Christopher Nolan’s films, for instance, because of the way he shoots things: too close to the action, too many close-ups on faces and various body-parts, lots of zooming around with the camera, so you can’t tell who’s doing what.  This movie did that one or twice (every action movie does), but for the most part it was very easy to keep track of what was going on.

Second, the moment I first heard Joss Whedon would be directing and writing the screenplay, I was pretty much sold.  I knew he would do a good job, and I was SO right.  Whedon put his signature on this film.  Lots of little references (Galaga, for one), and, of course, really really snappy funny dialogue.  The dialogue was HILARIOUS.  And, thanks to good acting and good direction, the dialogue worked really well in the movie.

And that’s the third big thing: the actors were fantastic.  Of course, I already loved Robert Downey Jr, and Chris Evans had done a good job in Captain America so I was okay with him, but I was pretty skeptical about Mark Ruffalo – especially because Edward Norton had done such a wonderful job as The Hulk, and I was pissed that Marvel had kicked him off the project merely because they didn’t want to give him the credit he deserved.  But Mark Ruffalo did a good job, and made the character his own.  And everyone else was marvelous (hehe) as well.

The plot was fun and quick paced.  The ending was satisfying.  There was so drama, but lots and LOTS of laughter in the audience last night.  The dialogue seriously had the whole theatre in stitches.  People, you seriously need to see this movie.  It was absolutely FANTASTIC.

Okay, time to switch gears for a moment.  I’m still talking about films here, but these are two Kickstarter projects I would to give shout outs to.

For those who don’t know what Kickstarter is: it’s a crowdsource funding site.  People pots projects on Kickstarter in order to ask for pledges/donations, and offer various awards for different price levels.  You can donate as little as a dollar, but of course the more you donate the cooler the awards.  The thing is, Kickstarter puts a 30 day limit on all fundraising events, the project must indicate a minimum price goal, and if that goal is not met by the end of the 30 days, they don’t get ANY of the money pledged so far.

Both of the projects I’m talking about today are ending on May 6th.  They only have a couple days left, and they are SO close to meeting their goals, but are having trouble making that final push.  I have donated to both, and I REALLY want to see how they turn out, so here’s me hoping some of you will consider checking them out and donating something.

#1: Dust, a scifi/fantasy film by indie company Ember Labs.  Check out their fundraising video:

Check out their Kickstarter page for more info, and to donate.

#2: Even Though The Whole World is Burning, a documentary about American poet W.S. Merwin (who has won the Pulitzer twice, and is also a political and ecological activist).

I couldn’t get the embedded video to work for this one, so please check out their Kickstarter page to watch their fundraising video and get more info.

I hope you all will consider donating a few dollars.  I think these are both very worthy projects.  If you aren’t impressed after you see the videos, well… I worry for you. ^_^

Okay, folks, that’s everything.  Time for me to get back to the scramble through final papers.  See ya later! Thanks!